Waist Beads and Weight Loss

 

Waist Beads are an excellent tool for women to feel more feminine and beautiful. These beautiful gemstone waist beads are usually hand made and customized. The tradition of wearing beads is an age-old one. They have been worn for varying reasons by royalty for body adornment, deification and decoration.

The wearing of beads on the waist was made popular by West Africans, specifically Nigerians. Overtime the culture of the use of beads has been associated with both spiritual and material reasons. In some parts of Africa, the beads are anointed in oils.

This practice aids in sensory pleasure for the man. Some beads are adorned with bells, which is a signal to let the man know that the woman wants to engage in sexual intercourse. The Yorubas have a revered usage attached to the waist beads. It is also worn as a form of birth control, as a way of preventing obesity or also for their, healing and therapeutic powers.

As far a waist training, waist beads are being used more and more in North America as a way to control weight gain and shrink your waist. Naturally, as the beads get tighter, you know you’re gaining a few pounds. So you can nip that weight gain in the bud before you’re struggling to button your jeans.

Here’s a few key things to remember when using waist beads for weight control:
1. Know Your Position – It’s important to know where your waist beads are sitting. If you want to use them for weight and waist control be sure to position them around your stomach and not just on top of your hips. They may look sexy on your hips, but they are doing nothing for your weight control. It’s also important to take them off at night

2. Know When To Eat – Even though you may feel that tight fit of your waist beads on days that you are heavier, it’s important to not stop eating all together–just change what you’re eating. When those waist beads tighten be sure to

…eat foods that will help flush our your kidneys and help you go to the bathroom on a regular basis (carrots, celery, juice blends, etc). That will help get rid of the excess weight you may feel around your waist. Also, stay away from salty foods when that happens because that will store up more water weight than you need.

3. Know The Feeling – They’re waist beads so enjoy them! Utilizing your waist beads as a fun tool to attract/tease your lover is great exercise for your mid-section (think belly dance moves). Also, throughout the day, don’t be afraid to contract and expand your stomach to work your stomach muscles. A good method for those who sit most of the day is to sit straight up and tighten your waist for a total of 5 minutes, then relax for two. Do this 4 times then repeat the whole exercise at least 3 times a day.

There you have it: beauty and history combine allowing all of us to define and embrace our curves.

 

 

Adinkra Waist Beads

Here’s a little story about the power of adinkra symbols.
About two years ago, a young woman came to visit me to purchase some waist beads. As she viewed the selection, she became excited when she saw a set of amethyst waist beads adorned with the gye nyame adinkra symbol. “What’s this?” she asked.
I explained an adinkra is a West African symbol, and each one presents a cultural message or wisdom. The gye nyame represents the power of Spirit with the message, “I fear no one but God.”
“Wow,” said young woman. “I never knew that!”
She then showed me the gye nyame she had tattooed on her shoulder! “You got that tattoo without knowing what it meant?” I asked, amazed.
“I got it about 6 months ago and the artist wasn’t sure of its meaning
,” she replied. “But I was drawn to it. I just liked the way it looked.” The adinkra’s meaning couldn’t have been revealed at a more appropriate time because she was experiencing a life-threatening illness and needed her courage.
Somehow our ancestors knew.

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Click here for adinkra waistbeads by Wrap and Soul

Waistbeads Among The Yoruba

FROM: ngrguardiannews.com

By Alloysius Nduka Duru

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THE use of beads especially waist beads in Nigeria is widespread across the various nationalities that make up the nation. There are similarities and peculiarities in their usage. However, the Yorubas developed the most varying and peculiar uses for waist beads. The Yorubas have developed a culture of bead usage that cuts across both material and spiritual aspects of the life of the people. In addition, they have also the capacity to produce the beads for varying purposes ranging from royalty, body adornment, deification and decoration.

The Yorubas are found in the southwest geopolitical delineation of present-day Nigeria. They are a vibrant and social people who accentuate their way of life in their day-to-day activities.

Beads are usually small round piece of glass, wood, metal or nut, pierced for stringing. They are either used for adornment such as the waist, neck, ankle or as decorative ornament in art work or even for royalty.

The art of beading is serial in process and serrated in composition. It has a step-by-step or one-by-one approach in stringing and when traded together, the beads stand for unity, togetherness and solidarity.

Beads of the waist are believed to posses the power to attract and evoke deep emotional responses; they are a sign of success and affluence as well as spiritual well being.

The origin of the Nigerian beads is still speculative due to its fragility portability and popularity.

Beads have been traded and used since time immemorial. However, the earliest known African beads are traced to Libya and Sudan. In Nigeria, the Nok terracottes and Igb Ukwu art display the use of beads in those societies as early as 500 B.C., however there is no concrete statement of origin to the beads.

A common usage of the item is for adornment especially on the waist. There is however varying purpose for which people adorn the waist beads.

Waistbeads are mostly worn by women folk, only in exceptional theatrical perform will a man adorn waistbeads to symbolize feminism. The waistbeads are synonymous with feminism.

The Yorubas have esteemed usage attached to the waistbeads. They refer to the waist bead as Ileke, “lagidigba” the term lagidigba means something big, thick or massive. The lagidigba is made of palm nut shells string together, while the bebe is made of glass.

The Yorubas have a belief that the waist beads posses some erotic appeal; they have the power to provoke desire or deep emotional response on the opposite sex.

Waist beads are also used by the Yoruba for birth control; the beads are laced with charms and worn by the women to prevent conception.

Beads are a precious ornaments to the Yorubas, hence when adorned by a women, accentuates her feminism or beauty. Beads also helps to portray the chastity of a maiden or women sensuality. Parent show their love for their girl child through gifts of waist beads that are colourful and expensive.

The lagidigba or palm nut shell beads is used for fecundity purposes. The nuts signify multiple births as they are in clusters, thus one can infer the high incidence of multiple births in Yoruba land to the usage of the lagidigba bead.

Brides seduce their spouses with the beads they adorn; some women are said to lace their beads with charms to make them irresistible to the male folks. The Yorubas can easily comment on a women’s moral standing by interpretation of the movement of the waist bead she wears. The way she moves her buttocks can depict her morals as either seductive or reserved.46b8_2

The Yorubas have a popular saying: “It is the beads that makes the buttocks to shake.”

Other users of the waist beads in Yoruba land are the Orisas or devotes of water deities and other priestesses, they adorn the waist beads for protection against spiritual attacks as well as part of their dress regalia.

Saturday, April 25, 2009

TO BE CONTINUED